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Our Impact

 

 

TxCEE believes in leveraging data for continuous improvement. We collect and analyze data to evaluate our own effectiveness, hoping to learn what’s working and what needs improvement in the services we provide.

 

Research & Evaluation

TxCEE conducted an intensive evaluation of our work with four Texas districts from 2012-13 to 2016-17. The goals of this work were in line with TxCEE’s overall mission of developing, identifying, retaining and rewarding effective educators, and ultimately, promoting gains in student learning.

 

Promoting these goals involved:

  • Supporting our four partner districts in providing job-embedded professional development via the System for Effective Educator Development (SEED), TxCEE’s professional learning system.
  • Implementing new educator evaluation systems that provided teachers and principals with feedback on their practice and on students’ academic progress.
  • Providing financial bonuses to educators deemed effective via evaluation system
  • Providing additional compensation to teachers who took on roles as teacher leaders in their schools. These teacher leader positions (Collaborative Learning Facilitators (CLFs) and Collaborative Learning Leaders (CLLs)) allowed effective teachers to take on new roles and responsibilities while also staying in contact with the classroom, continuing to teach or providing instructional support, mentoring, and coaching other teachers.

Results presented here come from the collection and analysis of a variety of data.

  • To assess implementation and perceptions of TxCEE and partner district activities, we administered surveys and conducted focus groups and interviews with educators at all levels of each district.
  • To identify trends in educator effectiveness and retention, and student achievement, we analyzed extant data (e.g., teacher retention records, educator evaluation and performance-based compensation data) and publicly-available state assessment data (e.g., STAAR scores)

 

Identifying and Retaining Effective Educators

TxCEE helped partner districts grow and retain effective educators, supporting them in identifying effective educators using innovative educator evaluation systems that involve multiple measures including student growth and observations of educator practice.

 

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In TxCEE partner districts, teacher effectiveness improved from 73% of teachers rated effective in 2013-14 to 89% rated effective in 2016-17.

In a large, urban partner district, teacher retention grew from 84% in 2013-14 to 95% in 2016-17. In addition, of the teacher retained, 95% were rated as effective in 2015-16 and 2016-17 (not graphed).

Note: Teacher retention was calculated in two-year increments for those districts where teacher retention data were available.

Closing the Achievement Gaps

TxCEE works with districts to implement systems that help high need schools close achievement gaps in student learning.

 

Examining student performance on the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) tests from 2012-13 to 2016-17, TxCEE partner districts reduced achievement gaps by 10 percentage points in Reading/ELA and 20 percentage points in Math.

Closing the achievement gaps calculations in reading and math relied on publically available, campus-level STAAR scores that were converted to standardized scores (z-scores) to allow for comparisons across grades, years, and STAAR test score scales.

From 2014-15 to 2016-17, on average, student performance on SLO assessments improved by 42 percentage points from the beginning to the end of each school year.

Note: Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) are learning goals teachers set for their students at the beginning of the school year. These results are based on average growth in SLO assessment scores aggregated across three school years.

 

Developing Educators

TxCEE provides a variety of supports to its partner districts. These include job-embedded professional development as outlined in the System for Effective Educator Development (SEED), TxCEE’s professional learning system. Under SEED, professional development opportunities are provided for educators at all levels of the district via Collaborative Learning Community (CLC) meetings. Districts also implement new educator evaluation systems, in which educator effectiveness ratings are based, in part, on measures of student growth such as Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). TxCEE also works with districts to establish teacher leader positions (Collaborative Learning Facilitators (CLFs) and Collaborative Learning Leaders (CLLs)), in which effective teachers take on new roles and responsibilities while also staying in contact with the classroom, continuing to teach or providing instructional support, mentoring, and coaching other teachers.

 

Perceptions of CLCs were largely positive, with over 80% of teachers agreeing that their CLC meetings transformed their classroom practices. What is more, this was true regardless of the subject teachers taught, demonstrating that SEED provides districts with an effective approach to providing relevant professional learning opportunities for teachers across content areas.

TxCEE supports districts in establishing teacher leadership positions that allow teachers to become instructional leaders at their schools while still remaining close to the classroom. These teachers leaders play an integral role in developing the instructional capacity of their peers, leading job-embedded professional development opportunities at each campus, and planning the scope and sequence for weekly teacher CLC meetings. When surveyed, 88% teachers reported feeling positive about the support provided by their teacher leaders.

TxCEE’s work centers on providing extensive training and support onsite in partner districts. This training and support focuses on helping districts implement systemic change in their human capital management systems, including educator evaluation and compensation systems. Looking at perceptions of this training through the lens of training provided on Student Learning Objectives (SLOs), which are a core feature of the educator evaluation systems districts established via partnership with TxCEE, 90% of educators agreed that training they received on Student Learning Objectives was effective.

Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) are learning goals teachers set for their students at the beginning of the school year. Using TxCEE’s SLO process, teachers are evaluated, in part, on how much progress their students make in achieving those goals. The process relies on a strong instruction and assessment cycle, where teachers assess students’ knowledge at the beginning of instruction, monitor student progress throughout the instructional cycle, and re-assess students at the end of the cycle to determine whether SLOs were met. Over the course of multiple years of implementation, 84% of teachers felt that the SLO process transformed their teaching practices.

 

Note: These results are based on responses to surveys TxCEE administered to partner districts in 2015-16 and 2016-17.

Rewarding Effective Educators

Increasing compensation for effective educators recognizes them for excellence in their work. With support and resources from TxCEE, partner districts devoted significant time, effort and attention to implementing complex educator evaluation and performance-based compensation systems. Educator evaluation systems produced “effectiveness” ratings based on student growth and observations of educator practice. These ratings informed two types of added compensation for educators:

 

  • Performance-based compensation for campus administrators, teacher leaders and classroom teachers.
  • Eligibility for up to $10,000 in stipends for those teachers deemed effective who took on teacher leadership positions. These teacher leader positions (Collaborative Learning Facilitators (CLFs) and Collaborative Learning Leaders (CLLs)) allowed effective teachers to take on new roles and responsibilities while also staying in contact with the classroom, continuing to teach or providing instructional support, mentoring, and coaching for other teachers.

$1,098

Average annual bonuses earned by educators rated as effective or highly effective

$10,000

Effective teachers were eligible for up to $10,000 in stipends for taking on additional teacher leader roles.